This is a version of Scrabble for players aged 5-12 featuring a double-sided board. The introductory version resembles more a crossword puzzle in which all the possible words have already been spelled out. This is an aid to learning about spelling. Points are earned by completing words. The reverse side is an entirely blank grid [1], leaving players to come up with their own words. A point is earned for each letter placed. Letters are formed from cardboard tiles and do not have values.

Players represent corporations competing to assemble city buildings in their orbiting planets and install them onto specially-prepared platforms in the city districts. Each player wants to construct the most living space in the blocks that feature the most desirable improvements (Greenspaces, Spaceports, and Megamalls). Players can also erect Billboards at a loss, to entice customers and to reserve space for future construction. At the end of four rounds of play, the player who has earned the most points is the most successful developer and the winner of the game!

The object is to cover your board with the small picture cards.

Each player chooses a time board showing pictures of various times of day.

The players take turns to draw from a pile of time cards and announce the time on the card. Players check their boards for the time and the player with the correct board puts the tile on it.

The first player to fill her board shouts “Time Out!” and has won the game.

The game’s theme is based on answering questions relating to popular advertising logos and brands. Players move their pawns around a spiraling board for answering questions correctly relating to a logo, until they get to the Winning Zone at the centre of the board. Movement depends on the successful answering of questions to proceed to the next coloured area on the board.

The world of horseracing has long been associated with cheating in all its forms. But few games ever attempt to simulate that aspect. Players are assigned a horse and must move it around the track by rolling a single die. This would be rather boring if the game didn’t allow for the players to bet on another player’s horse, so the dilemma is whether or not to move your horse badly just to make it easier for the horse you bet on to win. Even that could be boring, but then each player is issued cards that allow them to commit dirty tricks, for instance making a horse fall or forcing the winner to take a drug test. All in all, it makes for some very interesting racing.

This game is similar to the classic Ker Plunk. Players drop plastic monkeys through the hole in the top of the clear plastic “tree”. Several colored sticks are skewered through the tree trunk to keep the monkeys from dropping. Players roll a die and must remove a stick of the same color rolled. Be careful when choosing a stick. You must keep each monkey that drops during your turn. The player with the fewest monkeys when they’ve all dropped is the winner.

Cranium WOW includes an all new gameboard, 600 new cards with 15 fun activities (we promise), a 10-sided die (the 9-sided die just wasn’t working), a tub of lovely, lovely cranium clay, a timer, pads, pencils, 4 new character movers with custom hats and hairdos, and sass. Cranium is a roll and move game with four distinct decks of cards that have the players perform, answer trivia, sculpt, and use their knowledge of popular culture to advance through the board to the center. It is a very fun game and is designed for adults, or people who are “adult-like”.

each player works on their own dungeon blueprint. Drafted cards determine which elements — monsters, traps, and treasures — they have to add immediately. After fourteen cards have been drafted, the blueprint is passed to the next player, who then draws the route an anthropomorphic test hero will take because these days, even in the dungeon business, nothing works without quality inspection. The players receive their own blueprints back and try to keep the dummy hero from killing their monsters, stealing their treasures, and — obviously — making it out alive. They can use the drafted cards to fight off the hero or to support the heroes in their opponent’s dungeons. In the end, only the creator of the most devious dungeon will triumph.