In Suspend, you want to be the first player to get rid of your share of the 24 notched, rubber-tipped wire pieces that come with the game. How do you get rid of them? Throw them away? Hide them under a cushion? No – you must hang them from a shared tabletop stand, using only one hand to place the piece on an unoccupied space. If anything touches the table after you place your piece, you must remove and reposition it; if anything falls off, you have to keep those pieces and try to hang them again on future turns. The first player to suspend all of her pieces wins!

The game’s theme is based on answering questions relating to popular advertising logos and brands. Players move their pawns around a spiraling board for answering questions correctly relating to a logo, until they get to the Winning Zone at the centre of the board. Movement depends on the successful answering of questions to proceed to the next coloured area on the board.

The world of horseracing has long been associated with cheating in all its forms. But few games ever attempt to simulate that aspect. Players are assigned a horse and must move it around the track by rolling a single die. This would be rather boring if the game didn’t allow for the players to bet on another player’s horse, so the dilemma is whether or not to move your horse badly just to make it easier for the horse you bet on to win. Even that could be boring, but then each player is issued cards that allow them to commit dirty tricks, for instance making a horse fall or forcing the winner to take a drug test. All in all, it makes for some very interesting racing.

This game is similar to the classic Ker Plunk. Players drop plastic monkeys through the hole in the top of the clear plastic “tree”. Several colored sticks are skewered through the tree trunk to keep the monkeys from dropping. Players roll a die and must remove a stick of the same color rolled. Be careful when choosing a stick. You must keep each monkey that drops during your turn. The player with the fewest monkeys when they’ve all dropped is the winner.

Cranium WOW includes an all new gameboard, 600 new cards with 15 fun activities (we promise), a 10-sided die (the 9-sided die just wasn’t working), a tub of lovely, lovely cranium clay, a timer, pads, pencils, 4 new character movers with custom hats and hairdos, and sass. Cranium is a roll and move game with four distinct decks of cards that have the players perform, answer trivia, sculpt, and use their knowledge of popular culture to advance through the board to the center. It is a very fun game and is designed for adults, or people who are “adult-like”.

This is a drawing and guessing game full of Disney magic and it plays like Telephone. You each begin your story with a Disney character doing something a little unusual.

One player might have to draw Piglet mowing the lawn, another drawing Aladdin jumping out of a cake. Everyone passes their magnificent doodles to the next player who must guess what they can see. They in turn pass their guesses to the next player who tries to draw it. When everyone’s characters finally return to them, unveil the amazing journey they’ve all been on.

Points for the best drawings and silliest guesses.

each player works on their own dungeon blueprint. Drafted cards determine which elements — monsters, traps, and treasures — they have to add immediately. After fourteen cards have been drafted, the blueprint is passed to the next player, who then draws the route an anthropomorphic test hero will take because these days, even in the dungeon business, nothing works without quality inspection. The players receive their own blueprints back and try to keep the dummy hero from killing their monsters, stealing their treasures, and — obviously — making it out alive. They can use the drafted cards to fight off the hero or to support the heroes in their opponent’s dungeons. In the end, only the creator of the most devious dungeon will triumph.

each player works on their own dungeon blueprint. Drafted cards determine which elements — monsters, traps, and treasures — they have to add immediately. After fourteen cards have been drafted, the blueprint is passed to the next player, who then draws the route an anthropomorphic test hero will take because these days, even in the dungeon business, nothing works without quality inspection. The players receive their own blueprints back and try to keep the dummy hero from killing their monsters, stealing their treasures, and — obviously — making it out alive. They can use the drafted cards to fight off the hero or to support the heroes in their opponent’s dungeons. In the end, only the creator of the most devious dungeon will triumph.

The game board is piled high with money packs of different denominations. The money packs are ten bills of the same amount wrapped in a paper strip. Players roll dice and move around the board sharing one token. Follow the directions on the space either doubling their current money, landing on or passing an Easy Money space to collect one or two million dollars, collecting a Mystery Jackpot, holding a lottery or playing on Wall Street. All money is taken from the huge pile in the center of the board. The game ends when all the money is taken from the board and the player with the most money wins.

Operation is a dexterity game in which you must extract silly body parts from a hapless patient. In the course of the game you acquire cards which dictate that you must remove a certain piece from the body of the patient. To do this you use a set of tweezers that are attached by wire to the game board. If you are sloppy and touch the metal sides of the hole where the item is located, the patient’s pain is indicated by a sudden buzzer and light-up nose. Successful extractions net cash, and the player with the most cash at the end of the game is the winner.